News

Alice Leahy Trust re-opening Monday 20th July 2020

We are very pleased to inform you that our centre will re-open on Monday 20th July 2020 adhering to all Covid-19 guidelines.  It will not be possible for us to cater for the number of people we met prior to the pandemic however we will strive to cope with as many people as possible. 

Thanks to all our friends and supporters who kept in touch with us and gave us great encouragement during this very challenging time.

RE: COVID-19

After a lot of soul-searching and discussion with our Directors the Alice Leahy Trust decided to close on Friday 13th March.

Our centre is too small to ensure social distancing and the safety of our staff and the people who use our service would be compromised.

The people who call to use our service or visit us come from all over the city and beyond.

We too are conscious that we operate in the basement of a large city hostel and we must be mindful of their residents.

We do regret having to close but we had no option – we informed Dublin Regional Homeless Executive of our decision.

Jeanette is able to keep the office going from home and we liaise daily.

Like everyone else, we are daily monitoring the situation in these challenging times.

We look forward to the day when we can open our doors again but in the meantime – keep safe everyone.

Alice Leahy – Director of Services, Alice Leahy Trust

The Lord Mayor, Councillor Caroline Conroy spends a morning visiting the Alice Leahy Trust Centre – Tuesday 10th January 2023

From L to R: Alice Leahy, Director of Services, Lord Mayor Councillor Caroline Conroy and Chairman of Alice Leahy Trust, Maol Muire Tynan.
From L to R: Alice Leahy Trust Board Member Catherine Cleary, Lord Mayor Councillor Caroline Conroy, Alice Leahy Director of Services and Jeanette O’Brien, Manager
From L to R: Lisa Hackett, Catherine Cleary, Lord Mayor Councillor Caroline Conroy, Alice Leahy, Mark Duff and Brendan Corrigan.

Caring – we can do better

A time for reflection

Sir, – On New Year’s Day, the words from Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, broadcast on BBC television, “our care system is broken – it doesn’t have to be”, focused on caring for older people. His words were accompanied by film from a residential care setting, with elderly people looking so contented, being cared for lovingly by warm-hearted staff of many years. His elderly mother being cared for in the comfort of her own home summed up what is possible. The camera captured too the wrinkled faces and hands of lives long lived.

“Caring goes to the heart of what it means to be human,” he said. This is at a time in our own country when we are clearly seeing the result of decisions made far removed from the frontline, we could benefit from reflecting on his words.

At times one could be forgiven for thinking that those in the area of planning for the care of older people may have thrown the baby out with the bath water, based on what we see and hear on a daily basis.

We of course do have some great examples of caring, all requiring caring staff who are valued and adequately remunerated.

We owe it to older people to ensure they can live out their remaining years free from the worry of not being cared for and as a result feeling their lives were worthless.

We can only do something if we are prepared to acknowledge that we can do better, and yes we must.

The pending report from Archbishop Welby and his fellow Bishop of York will hopefully lead to a positive debate and outcome on an issue of great concern to us all, here and in the UK. – Yours, etc,

ALICE LEAHY,

Director of Services,

Alice Leahy Trust,

Dublin 8.